Teacher Performance Evaluations

Chesapeake Public Schools’ evaluation system revolves around the belief that “the core of education is teaching and learning, and the teaching-learning connection works best when [there are] effective teachers working with every student every day”(Stronge, 2006).  Teachers are met with the challenging and complex task of addressing the diverse needs of students within their classrooms.  With a comprehensive evaluation system that recognizes the intricacies of the profession, teachers can be provided the support, acknowledgment, and direction that is necessary for continued professional growth.

The Code of Virginia requires (1) that teacher evaluations be consistent with the performance objectives (standards) set forth in the Board of Education’s Guidelines for Uniform Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Teachers, Administrators, and Superintendents and (2) that school boards’ procedures for evaluating instructional personnel address student academic progress.

The Board of Education’s Guidelines for Uniform Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Teachers specifically address Standard 7, Student Academic Progress.  According to the guidelines, “The work of the teacher results in acceptable, measurable, and appropriate student academic progress.”  Additionally, the Guidelines provide that:

  • Evaluation systems should include the documentation of student growth and that the evidence of progress be reviewed and considered throughout the year.
  • Evaluation systems encourage the use of multiple measures of student academic progress.

Below are documents that have been created to assist teachers in documenting evidence of student growth through multiple measures (Please note that other principal-approved documents may be created to document students’ academic growth):

Evaluation Resources for Teachers(Must be on CPS Network to view)

 

Teacher Evaluation FAQ

Which teacher groups will be evaluated through the use of the new Teacher Evaluation system?

The Guidelines for Uniform Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Teachers set forth seven performance standards for all Virginia teachers.  Pursuant to state law, teacher evaluations must be consistent with the performance standards (objectives) included in the Guidelines.  

The Code of Virginia defines a teacher as the following: “Teacher” means a person (i) who is regularly employed full time as a teacher, visiting teacher/school social worker, guidance counselor, or librarian, and (ii) who holds a valid teaching license.

Non-classroom educators and non-core teachers, such as Guidance Counselors, Media Specialists, Technology Integration Specialists, Physical Education teachers, Music teachers, etc., who are required to hold a Virginia teaching license, will be evaluated through the use of the new evaluation system.  Guidance Counselors, Technology Integration Specialists, Speech-Language Therapists, and Media Specialists have modified performance standards upon which they are evaluated; however, these and all teacher groups are expected to write SMART Goals that will assist in providing evidence of student academic progress.

How often do teachers get evaluated?

Beginning the 2012-13 school year, teachers will begin to be evaluated every three years.  Non-tenured teachers, who are teachers who have taught for less than three years, will continue to be evaluated every year until they earn tenure at the conclusion of their third year of teaching.  Experienced teachers who are new to Chesapeake Public Schools are evaluated during their first year of employment with Chesapeake Public Schools.  Teachers receiving a “Below Expectation” or “Unsatisfactory” on any portion of their Summative Performance Evaluation will be evaluated the following school year.  It is, however, a principal’s discretion to include any teacher into an evaluation cycle at any time.

 

What measures are used to evaluate resource or non-core teachers?

Resource or non-core teachers are evaluated through the use of observations and the monitoring of SMART Goals, in addition to other measures such as portfolios, document logs, self-evaluation, etc.

 

Must teachers be evaluated using multiple data sources?

Yes.  The Code of Virginia requires two explicit data sources for documenting performance in teacher evaluation systems: Observation and Measures of Student Progress

Observation
§22.1-253.13:5 (A.)Standard 5. Quality of classroom instruction and educational leadership.
…Teacher evaluations shall include regular observation and evidence that instruction is aligned with the school’s curriculum.  Evaluations shall include identification of areas of individual strengths and weaknesses and recommendations for appropriate professional activities. [emphasis added]

Measures of student progress
§22.1-295 (C.) Employment of teachers.
School boards shall develop a procedure for use by division superintendents and principals in evaluating     instructional personnel that is appropriate to the tasks performed and addresses, among other things, student academic progress and the skills and knowledge of instructional personnel, including, but not limited to, instructional methodology, classroom management, and subject matter knowledge. [emphasis added]

§22.1-253.13:5 of the Code notes that teacher evaluation must include observation and “evidence” to be collected and included in teacher evaluation.  Various data sources such as student surveys, document logs, portfolios, and self-assessment, are provided as options for the evaluation of teachers.

How frequently are formal observations conducted?

Formal observations are conducted at least three times during a teacher’s evaluation year.  Principals can, however, choose to conduct observations more frequently.  Informal observations can be conducted at any time during the year for evaluated and non-evaluated teachers.  These observations might include the observation of instruction for a ten to fifteen-minute duration.  These visits are to obtain a representative sampling of performance during various times throughout the year.  Walk-through observations may also be conducted throughout the year.  Walk-through observations provide brief (three to five minutes) visits to classrooms.  These visits are helpful in obtaining information pertaining to standard instructional practices or for vertical and horizontal curriculum articulation across the school.

 

Are part-time teachers evaluated?

Yes.  Part-time teachers are evaluated through the same procedures as full-time teachers.

 

Are teachers evaluated on the summative achievement of their students?

No.  The measurement of Standard 7 (Student Academic Progress) is based upon the progress that students make over time.  Quantitative measures of academic progress should be based upon achievement measures that already exist within schools.  Progress should be measured based on the gain that students make throughout the year.

How does the rating system work within Chesapeake Public Schools’ revised Teacher Evaluation Instrument?

Overall Performance ratings of “Meets Expectations”, “Below Expectations”, and “Unsatisfactory” are assigned to each standard, then converted to a quantified rating of 1, 2, or 3 and multiplied by the appropriate weighted value.  The weighted scores for each standard are then added to determine the teacher’s overall Performance Rating Score.  Standards 1-6 are weighted at 10% each and Standard 7 (Student Academic Progress) is weighted at 40%.

Who evaluates itinerant teachers?

Itinerant teachers are evaluated by the administrators of their home school.  Administrators who share the itinerant employee may also contribute to the evaluation.  For example, one SMART Goal may be created for use at one school and another SMART Goal may be created for use at the teacher’s other school.  Principals can then confer at the conclusion of the school year to determine an appropriate rating for the employee.

How does the rating system work within Chesapeake Public Schools’ revised Teacher Evaluation Instrument?

Overall Performance ratings of “Meets Expectations”, “Below Expectations”, and “Unsatisfactory” are assigned to each standard, then converted to a quantified rating of 1, 2, or 3 and multiplied by the appropriate weighted value.  The weighted scores for each standard are then added to determine the teacher’s overall Performance Rating Score.  Standards 1-6 are weighted at 10% each and Standard 7 (Student Academic Progress) is weighted at 40%.

Who evaluates itinerant teachers?

Itinerant teachers are evaluated by the administrators of their home school.  Administrators who share the itinerant employee may also contribute to the evaluation.  For example, one SMART Goal may be created for use at one school and another SMART Goal may be created for use at the teacher’s other school.  Principals can then confer at the conclusion of the school year to determine an appropriate rating for the employee.

How does the rating system work within Chesapeake Public Schools’ revised Teacher Evaluation Instrument?

Overall Performance ratings of “Meets Expectations”, “Below Expectations”, and “Unsatisfactory” are assigned to each standard, then converted to a quantified rating of 1, 2, or 3 and multiplied by the appropriate weighted value.  The weighted scores for each standard are then added to determine the teacher’s overall Performance Rating Score.  Standards 1-6 are weighted at 10% each and Standard 7 (Student Academic Progress) is weighted at 40%.

How do I create a SMART goal?

The template below will assist in the creation of a SMART Goal. Stronge and Grant (2009) provide a Progress Goal-Setting Template that walks users through the goal-setting process. The Student Achievement/Program Progress Goal-Setting Template (Stronge & Grant, 2009) provided below will offer guidance to those needing assistance in the development of an appropriate goal statement that is Specific, Measurable, Appropriate, Realistic, and Time-bound. Download the Template. (Must be on CPS Network to view)

Sample SMART Goals for Teachers and Other Educational Professionals

Below, you will find several examples of SMART Goals for classroom teachers and Other Educational Professionals. Other Educational Professionals are educators who hold positions such as guidance counselor, speech therapist, transition specialist, and social worker. As a reminder, at least two SMART goals that address student achievement or program progress should be written as part of the teacher evaluation process. Download the Template. (Must be on CPS Network to view)